Greenwood History

Among my mother's papers, I found a blue binder with a cover that read, Greenwood Families by Kenneth P. Darling. It appears to have been written for the general public, without commercial publication, and thus it would not be a copyright violation to reproduce parts of it here. Thus, I am posting segments of it here and will immediately remove it if my perception of my right to post this is incorrect.

It begins with the following comment:

This genealogy is not published as a completed professional work. It is data gathered by a number of people for a number of years which is published so that it be available for future family genealogist to prove unproven elements and continue the total product. all too often family genealogist die and their years and expensive work remains in file cabinets or is destroyed. Not so with this data. Copies are on file in the DAR library, Washington, D.C., Clayton Library, Houston, Texas and the library in Salt Lake City. Best Wishes to all future researchers who find the family as interestinig as I have.

English history of the family and origin of the name

For full seven centuries the surname Greenwood has been in use in England. The early English Greenwood records given in this volume and a long Greenwood pedigree now in the College of Arms, in London, England, show the progenitor of the Greenwood family in England to have been a Wyomarus de Greenwode. All family records of Anglo-Saxan extraction are believed to run back to this Wyomarus and the name Greenwood may be regarded as having had its beginning with him. This Wyomarus was caterer to Maud, the Empress, mother of King Henry II, who reigned in England A.D. 1154-1189. Wyomarus furnished the provisions for the household of the Empress Maud (known also as Matilda) and was of the title gentry or nobility of his time. His coat of arms, which all Greenwoods are entitled to use, appears in this volume.

In the township of Heptonstall, Eng. (which is the West Riding of Yorkshire) 1 1/2 miles from Heptonstall village, on the old Roman highway which leads form Heptonstall to Colne, there stands today a grand old hall manor house, built of hand-hewed stoen. This house, which is of such ample pretentions as to be known as a mansion, has for many centuries been standing here. It is set high up on the slope of what is known as Hardcastle Crags of Hebden Valley. It over looks this beautiful wooded value and the scene presented is picturesque and enchanting. Many tourist are attracted to this by the grandeur of the scene. Accordiing to Thoresby's history of Leeds, the mansion was built by Wyomarus or his immediate descendants and was their home place. The mansion with its buildings and land attached is known as Greenwood Lee. The mansion is 20 miles dues west of Leeds and is 2 miles distant from the flourishing cotton manufacturing home of Hebden Bridge.

Three-fourth of a mile from Greenwood Lee, on the same old Roman road leading from Hepttonstall to Colne, is a second building of stone and is known as High Greenwood. This structure was rebuilt 100 years ago and is now much changed from its former appearance. In the neighborhood of Greenwood Lee and High Greenwood there are today such places as Greenwood Lee Wood, High Greenwood, Greenwood Lee Clough, Green Hill and others, and the public records of this d a plein itself. At one time this tract waws a forest and this little settlement took its name from that forest. It was a large tract of green wood, of waving trees of oak, ash, maple and birch and many other varieties of wood. Probably the foreset from which Greenwood took its name included the whole district from Stoneshay Gate to Widdop Gate and from the right side of the highway down to the river Hebden in the valley. The clearing in the forest was begun on the plateau skirting the valley. Here riGreenwood Lee was constructed; then folled the construction of High Greenwood, the Clough house and others. This settlement of Greenwood was one of the oldest in Heptonstall and the Greenwoods of the settlement from ancient times down o the present day have ever been prominent in shaping the history of that old town. Turn over the pages of history of old Heptonstall, either of its remote past or immediate present, and the name Greenwood stands out prominent before you. Whichever way you turn in Heptonstall you are confronted by that name. The largest tax payers in Heptonstall have ever been Greenwoods, while the records of the ancient parish church shows generous contributions by Greenwoods to the church and large bequests to public charity.

Previous to the year 1154 very few people in England had more than one name. Wyomarus was known only as Wyomarus. Surnames were introduced into England by the Normans after their invasion. In 1066, and many family names have originated in England since that time. After Wyomarus had established his home in the forest at Heptonstall, and a little settlement of his descendants was made there, he became known as Wyomarus de Greenwood (Wyomarus of Greenwooe). the children and descandants of Wyomarus also took similar names and were known as Bartram de Greenwood (Bartram of Greenwood) Robert de Greenwood (Robert of Greenwood) and so on, and the old public records of Heptonstall show that it was nearly as late as the year 1500 when the surname Greenwood became fully established and the Latin word "de" was omitted. Greenwood is a place name. The family takes its name from a locality and that locality the green wood or forest of Heptonstall. It is evident that the mansion, Greenwood Lee, took the first part of its name from the settlement Greenwood and the part of its name (Lee) from the fact that its location was sheltered or that the buildings afforded shelter to both man and beasts. Just the date Greenwood Lee was built there are no records that show. In 1362 Geenwood Lee is mentioned in Heptonstall public records as being occupied by Thomas de Greenwood. In 1379 hegh Grenewod (High Greenwood) is mentioned. There are no earlier public records referring to these buildings.

Public records referring to the Greenwoods at Greenwood are of much interest. From the earliest public court records we find that on Nov 22, 1274 one William Grenhod (Greenwood), was, for taking bushwood from Erringden forest fined 6 pense, and according to a record a pledge was given by Luvecock, his brother, that it would not occur again. In the following year, or Friday, in whit-week, 1275, John del Greenwode (John of the Greenwood) was fined in the court of the Lord of the Manor 2 shillings for the escape of 3 beasts to the meadows of Rawtonstall. These records show that at that time there was a settlement in the forest at Greenwood and that some of the land had been cleared, fenced and cultivated. The court of the manor was held at Wakefield by the Eart of Warren, or John de Warren, as his real name was. The Earl had been given by King Henry III (1250) free warren, or right to preserve the forests for game in Keptonstall, Wadsworth, Rawtonstall, Stansfield and Langfield and he punished all intruders. He was Lord of the Manor of that district and once when his right was questioned he unsheated his sword and stretching out his arm declared that it was that weapon that gave him his right.

In the year 1379 a poll tax was issued by King Richard II upon all persons in England over the age of 16 years in every parish or township. The tax list is of interest as showing who was liviing at Greenwood at the time. The list follows:

  1. Richardus de Grenwod & xv.iiij d. (Richard of Greenwood and wife 4 pence)
  2. Thomas de Grenewod & xv iiij d. (Thomas of Greenwood and wife 4 pence)
  3. Thomas de Grenewod & xv iiij d. (Thomas of Greenwood and wife 4 pence)
  4. Thomas de Grenewod iiij d. (Thomas of Greenwood single)

from the above list it would appear that 4 Greenwoods constituted the inhabitants of Greenwood in 1379 - three of the Greenwoods were married and their wives living and one single person liable to a tax on account of age. One of these Greenwoods was named Richard and three were named Thomas. Besides these married Greenwoods there may have been children under the age of 16. Each was taxed 4 pence and evidently the tax had no bearing on the property each held.

The records of the Court of the Manor show a Richard de Greenwood as a juryman in Oct., 1379 and in 1380 a Richard, son of Thomas de Greenwood, was a juryman at both April and October Turns. At an inquisition held at Halifax, 1362, a Thomas de Grenwod is named and described as the father of William and was probably lioving at Greenwood Lee. A Thomas de Grenewod was a juror of the Manor Court held 20tho f October, 1413, and was then living at High Greenwood. His name was second on the panel, a position he continued to occupy 1433 and 1434. Thomas de Grenewod, the single man on the poll list, may have been the Thomas de Grenewod whose name appears on a jury list 3rd of Oct., 1434, when he is last on the list of those enpaneled at the local Turn.

Public records show that soon after 1382 that the Monks of Lewes, in Yorkshire, had some control over the estates at Greenwood, and those adjoining and drew revenue from them, the right being given by the Earl of Warren.

In 1433 a John de Grenewod was living at Greenwood Lee and was the wealthiest landlord in Heptonstall, for he was paying a tax of 24s, 9 1/2 d annually in the way of rent, which was considered large as money was they valued.

On December 16, 1439, the 18th year of the reign of King Henry VI, a rental was made in Heptonstall by order of the Proctor of the Priory of Lewes and from this rental it is learned that one Thomas (Mitchell) was then living at "Heghegrenewodde" (High Greenwood) and paying rent to the Priory of Lewes of 6s 2d per year. The Mitchells had evidently married into the Greenwood family. Formerly they occupied adjoining estates. They are of Norman descent. John de Grenewodde of Grenewoddle (Greenwood Lee), the largest occupier in Heptonstall, paid an annual rent for Greenwood Lee of 6s, 7 1/2 d, for lands and tenements called Gloghehous (Clough house) which is situated near Greenwood Lee Clough, to the left of the road, 15s, for a close of land called "Gyllotraide," 4d., and tenements at "Robeshag" (Robert Shaw), near the slack Baptist chapel, 17d., for all other lands and tenements in Heptonstall not described by name, 17d.

Richard de Grenewode, probably son of John, the same year was holding lands and tenements at Colden-Ing, for which he paid yearly rent 20d. He also held one parcel of land called "Walkerwyfnge," for which he paid 4 1/2d.

William de Grenewodde held lands and tenements in Learing, in Heptonstall, for which he paid yearly rent 20d. He also rented "Esthap More" [East-Up-moore] for which he paid 20d., and also one acre of land taken from waste for which he paid 4d., per year. He is probably the same William Greenwood who was constable of Heptonstall in 1461. There was also a second Richard de Grenewodde who held lands and tenements in Heptonstall township, for which he paid 3s. 9 1/2d.

The rental list of 1439 shows that there were only 12 persons in the township of Heptonstall at that time paying rent. The combined rent of the 4 Greenwoods amounted to 34s 3 1/3 d. The combined rent of the other 8 persons was 22s., 8 3/4d. The largest tax payer was John de Grenewodde (John of Greenwood); second largest in Heptonstall, John Pygehils (Pickles), who paid for land and tenements in the town. 7s.

The old English public records show that very early the Greenwoods of Greenwood, in Heptonstall, began to scatter to the surrounding districts, marrying and intermarrying there, accumulating property and establishing homes. At one of the Turns of the Court of the Manor one Roger Greenwood of Sowery (6 miles from Greenwood), in 1326, was fined 3d. for his beasts unlawfully eating from the herbage of the forest. The record reads: "Rog'us de Grenwod, p. exh. best. iiij d." in 1432, a lease, which was in Latin, was made for 40 years of a certain property called "Huldiworth Inge." in the township of Ovenden, near Halifax, at 20x per year, to William Greenwood of Mixenden, by William Otes and others. In 1509 John Greenwood with Peter Crabtree, two clothiers (Manufacturers of cloth), acquired from Richard Young and Margaret, his wife, what is known as Old Town Farm, in Wadsworth, and the adjoining one known as Crabtree farm, in Wadsworth. In 1524 both these men paid a subsidy of 20s each of King Henry VIII and in later years they were both said to have been accused of using flocks in the manufacture of cloth. On his death John Greenwood was succeeded in business by his son William.

In 1563 William Greenwood, a merchant ot chapman, of Wadsworth, purchased from Wm. Brigg and Henry Brigg, his son and heir apparent, land called Potter Cliff, at Old Town, in Wadsworth, and about the same time he bought lands called Hirst from Henry and Charles Farrer, in Old Town. He was active in church matters for in the Heptonstall church registers, dated August 21, 1572, he signs an entry to the effect that 120 organ pipes have been laid up in church coffer.

Greenwood Lee, from the time of its construction, passed down through an unbroken succession of generations of Greenwood owners until 1642, when it passed out of Greenwood possession. The last Greenwood occupant of the estate was Rev. Charles Greenwood. He was rector of Thornhill, and through the influence of his own family had attained in the district as well as his connection with Greenwood Leee, he became Lord of the Manor of Heptonstall. He was a son of James Greenwood of Sowerby, a direct descendant of the Greenwoods of Greenwood Lee. His mother was Cecilia, daughter of Chas. Radcliff, of Todmorden. He left no living heirs. The will of the Rev. Charles Greenwood, proved July 14, 1642, provided for the establishment of a free grammar school in Heptonstall, the buildings for which he had erected. He also bequested K100 to be lent and put forth from year to year to ye poor people inhabiting within ye township of Heptonstall to succeeding ages for ever, the better to enable them to live by their labors in their honest vocations. He gave also money for the founding of two fellowships and two scholarships in University College, in Oxford, of which he had been fellow, and 1500 pounds more towards building a new quadrangle at the college, but the college was wronged of these bequests through the misconduct of the executors.

In 1650 Greenwood Lee was twice sold. For a time it was in possession of the family of Sutcliff. In 1760 it was purchased by Abraham Gibson and at present it is occuped by Mrs. M. E. Gibson, widow, and her son, Abraham, who are direct heirs of the Abraham first mentioned.

The last Greenwood occupant of High Greenwod was one William Greenwood whose last will was proved at York Apr 2, 1522 and his descendants. Iin 1559 High Greenwood was purchased by a Mr. Mitchell and it has remained in the Mitchell family ever since, having been passed down from one generationi to another. Both Greewood Lee and High Greenwood are today used as farmsteads. Both estates join and both extend from the moors at the summit of the hills to the valley below.

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*It appears from a manuscript in the British Museum No. 797 of the Harleian miss, beinig a collection relating to Moreley Hundred, that John Warren, Earl of Surrey, claimed free warren in Heptonstall by charter dated 37 of King Henry III, A.D. 1253. The right of the manor passed into hands for by an inquisition taken at Pontefract 25 Aug., 5th and 6th Phillip and Mary, or A.D., 1588, that Sir Henry Savile, Knight, died seized in fee tail of the manor of Heptonstall and from him it passed by degrees to Sir George Savile, of Rufford. In the 5th King Charles, 1629, court was held at Heptonstall by Charles Greenwood, Clerk, Rector of Thonrhill, Lord of the Manor of Heptonstall. Later the Right Honorable, the Earl of Scarborough, became Lord of the Manor of Heptonstall.

One of the descendants of Charles Greenwood was cornet to Captain Gascoigne and another, Ferdinand Geenwood, was lieutenant of horse in the service of King Charles the First, and was slain at Newark.

*The school building provided for by the will of Rev. Charles Greenwood is yet in use and stands close by the old churchyard in Heptonstall. The school house was given as a free gift to the people of Heptonstall and land and property at Colden, in Heptonstall, was endowed for the perpetual care of the building and continual salary of the master of the school. The executors of the will consisted of John Greenwood, son of Robert, Greenwood, John Greenwood of Elfaburgh Hall, William Mitchell, Thomas Greenwood of Learing and Richard Robertshaw and their heirs.

The buildings now at Greenwood Lee consist of a large two story stone house, about 30 X 40 feet in size, with a long ell 60 X 30 feet, also two stories. The house has five gables; roofs covered with slate of think stone, and the house is especially noticeable for the large number of chimney tops and stone balls above the roof. Back of the main house is a second stone house 40 x 40 feet in size, two stories high, with a gable, slated or stone roof. There is a large stone barn on the premises unique for its architecture. It is only one story high and has a high pointed roof. It is 100 feet long and 60 feet wide. In a stone over the porch of the large house is cut the figures 1712. This porch was rebuilt that year by the Sutcliffes. Otherwise the exteriors of all of the buildings are as they were originally made except new glass windows and chimney pots. The estimated age of the present buildings at Greenwood Lee is 500 years. Probably the present structures were built about the year 1400 and are an enlargement of the original or first buildings bearing the same name. High Greenwood was rebuilt it is believed to have been standing since the year 1260.

Accordinig to Tappan's History of England, as late at 1500 the poor people in this country lived in cottages made of sticks and clay. There were no real chimneys, but only a hole for the smoke to get out. With Greenwood Lee, High Greenwood and the Clough house, large buildings of stone, the Greenwods of Greenwood may be regarded as wealthy people for their time.

Ralph Thoresby in his history of Leesds, Eng., and the West Outriding of Yorkshire, published 1715, and Whitaker in an edition of Leeds, published 1816 both refer to a place known as New Laithes as famous for its long Greenwood occupancy. Thoresby says of New Laithes: "Here for many years resided the very ancient family of Greenwood descended from Wyomarus, who fourished ano. 1154, cater to Mawd the Empress." This New Laithes is the small village 5 miles north-west of Leeds, near the river Aire in the township of Newlay. New Laithes hall, or manor hourse, is yet standing, but no Greenwoods or their descendants are now living there. New Laithes hall came into possession of the Greenwoods as early as 1180 and was occupied by a Charles Greenwood as late as 1816. On Apr. 13, 1670, the estate was sold by a James Greenwood to Thomas Lord Viscount Savile, Earl of Sussex, but the estate was repurchased by a Jospeph Geenwood, who died there in 1728.

The Empress Maud, with whose household Wyomarus de Greenwod was connected was daughter of King Henry I, the third of the Norman kings to rule England. While still a child she married the Emperor of Germany; that person dying she was married to Geoffrey, Count of Anjoy, a Frenchman. Her mother was known as "Good Maud," daughter of the King of Scotland. By Geoffrey she had a son who became King Henry II of England.

In early English records which appear in this volume have been passed from one generation of Greenwoods to the next succeeding. In the year 1700 the records were din the keeping of James Greenwood of York; in 1815, they were in the hands of Joseph Greenwood Clayton, of New Laithes. (See Whitaker's History of Leeds) The records are in two parts. The first part is upon parchment. The second part is in the atograph of Sir William Dugdale. By these records every descendant of Thomas Greenwood of Newton, Mass can trace an unbroken line of ancestry extending over a period of 700 years and through many generations. The line of descent in the English records from Thomas of Newton runs through John Greenwood, the priest, who was the great grandparent of Thomas.

The old church of Heptonstall (Thomas a' Becket) at which all Greenwoods of the parish worshipped, was built as early as 1260, but is now in ruin. It was disused in 1854. An effort is being made to perpetually preserve the now standing walls of the old stone structure and contributions for this purpose are solicited from all iinterested persons. The Vicar of the Heptonstall Parish Society, Heptonstall, Eng. receives subscriptions. The registers of the old church run back only to 1593. The first Greenwood interment entries are: March 20, 1593, twin children of William Grenwod, Wadsworth; March, 1594, infant of Richard Grenwod, of Ayringden, Apr. 10, 1594, John, son of John Grenwod, of Stansfield,; June 7, 1594, wife of Ric. Grenwod of Lang; June 11, 1594, infant of Simion Grenwod.

No Greenwood marriages were recorded in 1593, but in 1594 there were two: May 5, Matthew Grenwod and Jane Buckley and Richard Grenwod and Agnes Grenwod. In 1599 these baptisms appear, the first in the registers: July 15, Grace, dau. of John Greenwood of Wadd.; 22d, Doriti, dau. of Willilam Greenwood; 22 Grace, dau. of Thomas Greenwood; Aug. 12, John, son of Simion Grenwod of Wad.

A John Grenewod was clerk (in HOly orders) of the Heptonstall Church in 1439, a Sir John Grenwodde, curate, in 1531, and Thomas Greenwood, of Elphaborough Hall, officated 1712-1744. He died 1748. A gallery at the west end of the north nave of this church was called High Greenwood loft, but when erected is not known.

In the gallery of the tower of the new church of the Heptonstall parish society at heptonstall, is amarble tablet placed in memory of a John Greenwood, whose death occurred June 16, 1823, age 81, in recognition of his gift to charity. Names of the wives of his three marriages and those of his children are also given.

A John Greenwood, of Cottingly, as shown by a deed dated Feb 20, 1598, elft the sum of K40 to be lent from year to year for ever, to the poor of Heptonstall parish and K20 to the poor of Bradford-dale. Paul Geenwood of Old Town, Wadsworth, left 20 shilling a year for the poor people of Wadsworth and 20 shillings a year for the minister of Heptonstall.

John Geenwood, of the Learings, in Heptonstall, by his will dated Feb 10, 1687, left an annuity of 20s. for the minister of Heptonstall Church and one of 20s. for the purpose of apprenticing a poor man's child.

John Greenwood, of the Hippings, in Stansfield, by will dated Dec 13, 1705, left 20s. yearly forever to the minister at Heptonstall for the preaching of a sermon the firstd Wednesday in August yearly.

Referring to the number of Greenwoods now living in Heptonstall vicinity a public writer says: "In the Calderdale district, from Halifax to Todmorden, the number of Greenwoods is positively amazing. One cannot take up a newspaper or attend some public or social function, or visit the homes of the people, but the name of Greenwood stands out in numbers almosdt like the stars in the firmament; and when one remembers that all these came from the original stock found at Greenwood, in Heptonstall, some centuries ago the thought cannot fail to be brimful of significance."

The following information is compiled by K.P. Darling, 7490 Brompton#478, Houston, TX 77025 Date 1979

Name Birth   Location
Bartham de Greewode of Greenwode Mar.    
Jonatha Death 1172 England
  Burial    
Wyomarus de Greenwode was caterer to Mawde, the Empress mother of King Henry II, who reigned in Englad A.D. 1154-1189. Wyomarus furnished the provisions for the household of the Empress Mawde (known also as Matilda) and was of the titled gentry or nobility of his time.

 

Name Birth   Location
Bartham de Greewode of Greenwode Mar.    
Jonatha Harringill Death 1172 England
  Burial    
Wyomarus de Greenwode was caterer to Mawde, the Empress mother of King Henry II, who reigned in Englad A.D. 1154-1189. Wyomarus furnished the provisions for the household of the Empress Mawde (known also as Matilda) and was of the titled gentry or nobility of his time. Jonatha Harringhill's father was Esq. John Harringill of High Melton, England
Children:
Name Birth   Location
Bartham de Greewode of Greenwode Mar.   England
Jonatha Harringill Death 1172 England
  Burial   England
Robert Greenwode of Greenwode
Dionise Swillington

 

Name Birth   Location
Alexander de Greenwode 1258   England
Unknown Lenthrope Death   England
  Burial    
Christian Olderwark Death   England
  Burial    

(1) Lenthrope was the daughter of Thomas Lenthorpe of Lenthorpe. No children by her.

(2) Christian Olderwark was the daughter of Roger Olderwark. John, Anne, and Mary were born in this marriage.

Children:
Name Birth   Location
John de Greenwode of Greenwode     England
Mary Greenwode Death   England
John Greenwode Esq. Burial   England
 
 

 

Name Birth   Location
William Grenwode of Wickerley Esq. 1239   England
  Death   England
  Burial    
? Boland Death   England
  Burial    
 
Children:
Name Birth   Location
Richard Greenwode m. Elizabeth Stenbrough     England
John Grenwode m. ? Sherbrooke     England
Edmund Greenwode m. Rachel Crumbellbotham     England
Elizabeth is the daughter of Henry Stenbrough of Stenbrough. Miss. Sherbroke is the daughter of John Sherbrooke. Rachel is the daughter of John Crumbellbotham Esq.
 

 

Name Birth   Location
Richard Greenwode, Lord of Wickersley, son of William Greenwode and Boland     England
Elizabeth Stenbrough, d. of Henry Stenbrough Death   England
  Burial    

(1) Lenthrope was the daughter of Thomas Lenthorpe of Lenthorpe. No children by her.

(2) Christian Olderwark was the daughter of Roger Olderwark. John, Anne, and Mary were born in this marriage.

Children:
Name Birth   Location
John Greenwode m. Dionis Selyocke     England
       
       
Dionis is the daughter and heiress of Thomas Selyocke
 

 

Name Birth   Location
Alexander de Greenwode of Greenwode son of Robert de Greenwode and Jane Brigham 1258   England
C? Lenthorpe Death   England
  Burial    
 
Children:
Name Birth   Location
John de Greenwode of Greenwode     England
Katherine Titchburne     England
Mary Greenwode     England
Anne Greenwode m. Thomas Mawtby Esq.     England
(1) Lenthorpe was the daughter of Thomas Lenthorpe of Lenthorpe. No children by her. (2) Christian Olderwark is the daughter of Roger Olderwark. John, Anne, and Mary are children by her.
 

 

 

Name Birth   Location
John Greenwode son of Lord Richard Greenwode and Elizabeth Stenbrough 1468   England
m. Dionis Selyocke, daughter of Thomas Selyocke Death   England
  Burial    
 
Children:
Name Birth   Location
John Greenwode of Greenwode     England
      England
      England
      England
 
 

 

 

Name Birth   Location
Thomas Greenwode son of John Greenwode     England
Wife's name unlisted Death   England
  Burial    
 
Children:
Name Birth   Location
John Greewode     England
 
 

 

 

Name Birth   Location
John Greeewode son of Thomas Greenwode     England
Unknown Death   England
  Burial    
 
Children:
Name Birth   Location
James Greewode m. Michael 1485   England
 
 

 

 

Name Birth   Location
James Greenwode of Greenwode son of John Greenwode 1486   England
  Death   England
  Burial    
 
Children:
Name Birth   Location
Thomas Greenwode 1513   England
John Greenwode     England
Nine additional children. Names unlisted     England
       
 
 

 

 

Name Birth   Location
Thomas Greenwode 11513   England
Margaret Draper     England
       
 
Children:
Name Birth   Location
JJames Greenwode m. Annas Bentley 1534-37   England
John Greenwode     England
Isabel Greenwood m. Edward Mawde     England
Annas Greenwood m. Gilbert Deane.     England
Alice Greenwood m. Robert Sutcliffe     England
Jennet Greenwood m. Edmund Mawde bro of Edward     England
Elizabeth Greenwood m. Richard Furness     England
 
 

 

Name Birth   Location
James Greenwood 1534-37   England
Margaret Draper     England
       
 
Children:
Name Birth   Location
James Greenwood m. Ann Parker 1537   England
John Greenwood 1556 d. 6 Apr 1593   England
Anna Greenwood m. Charles Hartley     England
James Greenwood     England
Margaret Greenwood m. Robert Whitakers     England
Jenet Greenwood m. George Robertshawe     England
James is a son by (1) Anna Bentley. Other children are by (2) Elizabeth Mawde.
 

 

Name Birth   Location
James Greenwood 1537   England
(1) Ann Parker (2) Jennet Bentley     England
       
 
Children:
Name Birth   Location
John Greenwood m. Annas Waterhouse     England
JRobert Greenwood m. Alice Robertshaw     England
Henry Greenwood     England
James Greenwood m. Cicely Radcliffe     England
Lane Greenwood     England
Isabel Greenwood 1552   England
Christabel Greenwood m. Stephen Longsden      
John Greenwood      
John Greenwood (son by Jennet)     England
James is a son by (1) Anna Bentley. Other children are by (2) Elizabeth Mawde.
 

 

Name Birth   Location
James Greenwood     England
(1) Annas Waterhouse (2) Alice Widdop (3) Cicely Ratcliffe     England
       
 
Children:
Name Birth   Location
James Greenwood m. Elizabeth Chapelhouse     England
       
 
 

 

Name Birth   Location
James Greenwood 1537   England
(Elizabeth (Alice) Chappelholme     England
       
 
Children:
Name Birth   Location
John Greenwood of Wrenthorp m. Ann Marsh     England
Robert Greenwood m. Anne Warren     England
James Greenwood     England
William Greenwood of Wakefield     England
Isabel Greenwood m. Richard Lister     England
Mary (Marg) Greenwood m. Richard Ibbotson     England
Elizabeth Greenwood m. William Ingel      
Anne Greenwood m. Richard Waterhouse      
       
Anne is a daughter of ? Warren of Wakefile. Richard Lister is of New-Lathes. Richard Ingel of Rotherham. Richard Waterhouse of Wakefield.
 

 

Name Birth   Location
John Greenwood of Wrenthorp 1537   England
(1) Anne Marsh of Thornhill (2) Ellen Cuts in Essex     England
       
 
Children:
Name Birth   Location
James Greenwood m. Sarah Burdett 1602/03 d. bef 1674   England
Ann Greenwood m. Christopher Naylor     England
Christopher Naylor of Wakefiled, Esq. Barrister at Law. This James Greenwood is James Greenwood of Stapleton, formerly of Guiseley, near Darrington. This John Greenwood purchased Wrenthorp and built a conveniet store there; he afterwards sold it to Mr. Francis Hey for the use of Mr. Edward Loaden, who afterwards sold the same to Mr. Robert Benson, Clerk of the Assizes for the Northern Circuit, and Father of Lord Bingley.
 

 

Name Birth   Location
James Greenwood 1602/03 d. bef 1674   England
(1) Sarah Burdett (2) mary Bellhouse     England
       
 
Children:
Name Birth   Location
Samuel Greenwood (son by 1st marriage) m. Judith Webster     England
William Greenwood of London     England
James (+) m. Frances Farrer 1643-4 d. 1713   England
Francis     England
Henry Greenwood of Knottingley     England
John Greenwood of Leeds m. Ann Waterhouse 1552   England
Charles Greenwood      
(*) James's wife and son Wimmiam joined him in the Conveyance. The estate was afterward repurchased by Joseph England Greenwood, 5th son of Samuel and Judity.
Samuel Burdett was of Moor-Grange near Leeds

Mary Bellhouse daughter and coheriess of Francis Bellhouse of Newsome

Frances Farrer is the daughter of William Farrar of Ewood, living in 1712

James Greenwood of Stapleton, afterward of York, abt. 1773. This James sold his estate at Stapleton and afterwards retired to York, where he died. He was buried at St. Sampson's Church as was also his wife. He sold the Estate at New-Laths to Jon. Swaine of Horsforth in 1699.
 

 

Name Birth   Location
William Greenwood of London 1537   England
      England
       
 
Children:
Name Birth   Location
Robert Greenmwood

b 1617

d bef 1656

  England
John Greenwood 1619 d. 7 Sep 1679   England
Thomas Greenwood m. Elizabeth 1620 d. 1658   b. England d. Isle of Wight, Virginia
James Pyland married Thomas's widow before 19 Feb 1662
 

 

Name Birth   Location
John Greenwood 1619   England
  Death    
  7 Sep 1679   Parish of St. Michaels, Middlesex Co., VA
 
Children:
Name Birth   Location
Thomas Greenwood m. (2) Elizabeth 10 Feb 1729   Virginia
James Greenwood 16 Oct 1722 d. 17 Oct 1722

Virginia

b. Christ Church Parish Register, Middlesex Co., VA

Richard Greenwood m. Anne Baskitt 10 Aug 1721   Virginia
Anne Baskitt Greenwood died Oct 30, 1731, Christ Church Parish Register, Middlesex County, Virtinia. Came to the US iin 1635.
 

 

The Parish of St. Michaels

Burial of John Greenwood - September 7, 1679 (Book) (Hottens)

Emigrants to America Plantations


In the Peter Bonaventure, Thomas Hormon, Mr., bound for the Bardoes, this underwritten names p. order: they have taken ye oath of supremacie and allegeance.

Thos. Greenwood age 15


January - 1634 (spelled Greenewood)

Theis under names are to be transported to St. Chrystophers and the Barbadoes, James Romey, Jr., bound tither, have taken the oath of allegiance.

John Greenwood age 26


November 20 - 1635

Theis under written names are to be transported to the Barbadoes, imbarques in the Expedition Peter Blockler, the men have taken the oath of allegiance and supremecie and have been examined by the minister of the town of Grovesend touching their conformitie to the order and discipline of the Church of England die and do ped.

Robert Greenewood age 18

VIRGINIA FAMILY

5893. An old English shipping list contains this entry: "John Greenwood, age 16, bound for Virginia, sailed from port of London, January 1, 1635, ship Bonaventure, James Recrofte, mater, was examined as to his conformity to the English Church and took ye oath of allegience." This John Greenwood permanently settled in Virginia and has descendants now living in various parts of the United States. He was probably of the family of William Greenwood of London, who had sons, Robert b. in 1617; James Greenwood, who married Mary Belhouse, daughter of the town clerk of Leeds. His great grandfather is described as a French merchant, or one who traded in French goods. This branch is known as the Greenwoods of Stapleton. A full description of the branch, together with its coat of arms, is given in this volume under the heading of "The Greenwood Arms". The branch is connected directly with Greenwood Lee, through a James Greenwood.

5894 William Greenwood. Descendant of the above John, b. in Virginia about 1738, had sons Bartlee, John, William and probably Abraham.He was a soldier in the Revolutionary War but was taken sick int he service and his place was filled by his oldest son, Barlee, b. in 1760 then 16 years old, who served 6 years. He was a member of the famous body know as the "Light Horse Harry Lee," which was in command of an ancestor of Ge. R. E. Lee, of the Souther Confederacy.

5894a John Greenwood, son of the preceding William, b. in Virginia about 1794, moved with his parents to Warren Coiunty, Ky. when quite young and studied law with Judge S. T. Logan at Glasgow, KY but did not enter the legal profession, married in Barren County, Kentucky, Tryphena Garrison, when he lived utnikl 1831, when he moved to Sangamon County, Illinois and the same year to Peoria, Illinois, where Mrs. Greenwood died May 26, 1832. He married second November 20, 1832, mary Gale. later he moved to Buck's Ferry, Lee County, IL where he was accidentally killed while rasising a house for himself. His widow was three times married.

Note: The following data was given to Mr. Darling (who compiled this information) by Hulen (High) M. Greenwood of Hoiuston. I have neither proven nor disproven his data but am including it here for further research.

8123 Glen Valley Drive

Houston, Texas 77061

November 23, 1982

Dear Col. Darling: Re: our family history. Briefly, here is the line of descent as of data:

(1) Thomas Greenwood of Middlesex County, Virginia, died 210/1729. He left an oral will only; his widow Elizabeth filed an inventory on April 17, 17830; there were 8 children: John b. 1716, my line. Also Rhodes 1720, Elizabeth, 1715, Mary 1718, Janice 1722, James 1724, Benjamin, d. early, Samuel b. 5251729.

(2) John, above , married Lucretia MacTyre on July 25, 1734 in Middlesex County. She was born July 21, 1717, a daughter of Hugh MacTyre and Catherine George (dau. of Robert George and Sarah Elliot). They had 7 children, bron in Middlesex County.

  1. Thomas, b. 2/131735; married Jane Bristow, 14 children
  2. William, b. 928/1740; 4 sons Barlee and 3 others.
  3. Robert, b. 5217743; 5 children
  4. Bodowick (Lodowick) b. 6251745
  5. John b. 8/9/1747, my line; married Ann Bates, 1769
  6. Hugh, b. 1750, married Cary Hudson, son Hugh Bird
  7. Francis, b. 6/131745 ?

John (5) above was one of the group of Baptist dissenters who got in trouble in Virginia, thereby; decamped and ended up in Georgia; he d. 1796. His son, Fleming Greenwood married Lavina Gatewood, who was descended from Henry Gateood, and on the distaff side from Dudleys and Suttons back in England.

Of their children, son Garrison Greenwood, emigrated ca 1812 to Illinois where they organized Jefferson County. In 1833 they upped stakes and came to Texas to David Burnet's colony, with several families of Parkers and Jordans and Frosts, settling near Palestine where they built "Old Fort Sam Houston."

Garrison had a flock of kids, among whom was Joseph Jordan Greenwood of Lampasas. He had two sons, Carl and Charles. carl, my father, made his home in Austin, where I was born in 1914. I have lived since 1941 in Houston. I am, alas, a widower, with a bachelor son, Darden, born in 1945. I can, of course, flesh out the bare bones above if you care to have it. I'd be much interested in your line from Barlee -- have often wondered about his descendants. I've been able to trace the Bates and Fleming lines back to the immigrants, but not that Thomas Greenwood. You own surname must be extremely rare!

Cordially yours,

Hulen (Hugh) M. Greenwood

OUR JOHN GREENWOOD OF VIRGINIA

For many years, since 1939, my Dad and later I tried to connect our own John with his ancestors in Virginia; our hope was to trace back to the original immigrant. although we could find lines of our Bates and Fleming ancestors leading to the first immigrants, we failed with our Greenwoods.

There is a welter of records, naming early Greenwoods. The one vital document needed is somebody's will in which everybody is named and such are all too rare in early days. Add to this the habit of giving children only two names, and we struggle with a gaggle of Johns, Richards, Samuels, Thomases, and with Elizabeths, Marys, Sarahs, and Susannahs without end - to say nothing of all the Henrys and Josephs and Marthas and Helens. We are permitted occasionally to draw some inferences in order to make any progress at all.

Consider this from our cousin, Mrs. Lois Newsome, of Route 1, Box 318, Odess, Texas 79763 (she is descended from Hugh Greenwood, probably a brother of our John)

From the records of Christ Church in Middlesex County, Virginia, on page 365, we find notice of an oral will of one Thomas Greenwood who died on February 10, 1729, this names a son, John Greenwood, to be his exector if his widow should marry again; it implies there are other children; the record was signed by Richard Greenwood (presumably a brothe rof the deceased Thomas) and by Elizabeth E. Garritt (a married sister of Thomas?)

On April 17, 1730: The widow (and presumably also the executirx Elizabeth) produces a document fo the record - probably an estate inventory, "proved" by Richard Greenwood nad Elizabeth Garritt. The chilren were eight in number; the first four were possibly children of Thomas and Elizabeth while the last four are almost certainly their children.

  1. John, born 1716, Note that in 1729 he was only 13 years old and could not be the John was was appointed contingent executor of the oral will. There's a fatal discrepency here.
  2. Rhods, born 1720 (Thomas Greenwood III 2313 Navaho Ave., Placentia, CA 92670 is descendant).
  3. Elizabeth, born 1715
  4. Mary born 1718
  5. Janice born 12 October 1722
  6. James, born 17 July 1724
  7. Benjamin born 2 October 1726 died 1735
  8. Samuel, born 25 May 1729 (posthumous child)

Now we are sure of this much:

John Greenwood (above b. 1716) married Lurcetia Mac Tyre on 25 July 1734 (he was only 18 year old) in Middlesex County. She was born 21 July 1717, a daughter of Hugh MacTyre and wife Catherine George (daughter of Robert George and Sarah Elliot) Their children born in Middlesex County were:

  1. Thomas, born 13 February 1735.
  2. William born 28 September 1740
  3. Robert, born 21 May 1743
  4. Bodowick (or Lodwick) born 25 Jun 1745
  5. John, born 9 August 1847 (my ancestor)
  6. Hugh born 1750 (father of Hugh Bird Greenwood)
  7. Francis, born 3 June 1745
Thomas (1) died ca 1811, Meckleburg County, married Jane Bristow in 1755 in Mecklenburg County. She was born 22 July 1736 in Middlesex county,